Saturday, July 23, 2016

A new student review of Grateful Bob: Tommy Defeats the Dragon by Bob Briggs

Jowill posted a new student review of Grateful Bob: Tommy Defeats the Dragon by Bob Briggs. See the full review.

This is a good book for talking to young children about being worried, afraid, or anxious. It lets them know that these are all normal feelings that everyone has at one time or another.  

I didn't like the questions posed to the reader throughout the story. However, I feel that component makes it a good book to read to children and give them an opportunity to discuss their feelings.

Overall, the story has an excellent message and would be a great tool for any parent, teacher, or counselor.

I would recommend this book for young children, aged 7 and younger. 

Friday, July 22, 2016

A new student review of Grateful Bob: Tommy Defeats the Dragon by Bob Briggs

sschu5 posted a new student review of Grateful Bob: Tommy Defeats the Dragon by Bob Briggs. See the full review.

This is a really good book for young readers. It is easy to understand and teaches a valuable lesson. The author helps young children become more aware of what things their friends or family members might be facing. Overall, this is a really good book.

A new student review of Vampire Book of the Month Club by Rusty Fischer

lovereading posted a new student review of Vampire Book of the Month Club by Rusty Fischer. See the full review.

Vampire Book of the Month Club is a story within a story. It is pure genius to make an author a part of the story and put mystery and horror as a side effect to accentuate the book. The idea that a heroine is willing to do anything to help the people she loves is not new, but it is this kind of classic writing with a modern twist that makes this book so compelling to read. Fans of ages 8+ would almost certainly love this book. I hope you enjoy the unknown in this book, because you never know... Who else is lurking among us? Happy Reading!

A new student review of Valley of Fires by J. Barton Mitchell

Jatay posted a new student review of Valley of Fires by J. Barton Mitchell. See the full review.

This was a really fast-paced book with lots of action. In order to understand what's happening, I definitely advise reading the other books in the series. This was the only book I read in the series, and some parts were confusing. I really liked this book because there was never a dull moment, and there were lots of cliff-hangers. The only drawback was that the plot was sometimes unrealistic, for example when Mira and Holt had a perfectly planed escape and when they miraculously evaded certain death over and over. My favorite character was a daring girl named Ravan. She is not one of the main characters, but I like her because she is an awesome pirate.This is a great book for Sy-Fi and dystopian readers.  

Wednesday, July 20, 2016

A new student review of Supergirl At Super Hero High by Lisa Yee

OrcaGirl posted a new student review of Supergirl At Super Hero High by Lisa Yee. See the full review.

I think the author had a great idea for the prologue; it keeps you wanting to read more, yet tells you the beginning of the story. I like how the author puts a spin on the regular Supergirl but keeps the tale true to its roots. The author makes this book feel like a typical high school story as well as a super hero story. The addition of the character Granny Goodness puts it over the top! 

I recommend this book to anyone who likes the following: super heroes, mystery, adventure, and above all, suspense.  I recommend it to girls age 10-12, or the tween years. It may prepare you for what’s ahead!

The book can help you to feel more secure about yourself, just like Super girl. Throughout most of the story, she was unsure of herself, but at the end she believes in herself.

Tuesday, July 19, 2016

A new student review of MORTIMER: A Chapter Book by Mary T Kincaid

sschu5 posted a new student review of MORTIMER: A Chapter Book by Mary T Kincaid. See the full review.

This is a good book. It teaches a lesson about accepting people even if they are different. ​Mortimer also encourages trying new things. It would be a great story to read to children at night before they go to bed. This is an excellent chapter book for young kids who have learned to read independently.

Sunday, July 17, 2016

A new student review of The Island of Beyond by Elizabeth Atkinson

Booklover1111 posted a new student review of The Island of Beyond by Elizabeth Atkinson. See the full review.

I liked The Island of Beyond because it had great details. I could picture the mansion in my head because of the way the author made it sound spooky and scary. I liked how Martin changed throughout the book--from the beginning, when he didn't really have friends and he just kept to himself, all the way to the end when he got more daring to try new things. I think that Solo was an interesting character. You really didn't know much about him until the end of the book. He is the opposite of Martin because, unlike Martin, Solo does a lot more things that take courage, and he practically lives outdoors. The island, like all the characters, is strange and mysterious. The book was a little slow in the beginning, but in the end it was worth the wait. I also liked how I could connect to the adventure in the book. You should read The Island of Beyond if you like realistic fiction with a twist of adventure.

A new student review of Never Missing Never Found by Amanda Panitch

JesusFreak posted a new student review of Never Missing Never Found by Amanda Panitch. See the full review.

The first thing that made me interested in this book was the gorgeous cover art. The colors are eye-catching and the font is captivating and different. Upon opening the book and reading the first chapter, I was thrown right into the story. It grabbed me and didn’t let me go throughout the entire book. The plot moved quickly and I wasn’t bored at any moment. The main character, Scarlett, was a complex character that I wanted to know more about. I was curious about her past and about what kind of person she would be. Though at times I greatly disagreed with some of her actions, she was an unusual character who was intriguing to read about.
With twists that will keep you on the edge of your seat, Never Missing Never Found is an exhilarating read that will leave you amazed.

Saturday, July 16, 2016

A new student review of Going Where It's Dark by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

Ampster posted a new student review of Going Where It's Dark by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor. See the full review.

Going Where It's Dark started from the very first chapter as a unique, heartwarming story of overcoming challenges and never giving up. Buck was introduced with such a personality and a desire to fit in that it just about tore my heart out. The book was very well written and really captures detail. I couldn't put this book down! Naylor writes with such care, making it feel like she poured her soul into this book.

My personal favorite character was Nat. Nat is the only boy his age who even talks to Buck once David moves away. Nat has a great sense of humor, and even hangs out with Buck, solving the mystery of the stolen lumber. Nat notices Buck's stuttering, but doesn't really make a big deal about it, unlike Pete. Jacob's personality is one that many people might hate, but deep inside every heart of stone is sadness, and that really makes me think of Jacob in a positive way.

Buck is a strong protagonist with perseverance, and even when he hates himself for his disability, he still finds the courage to smile. What really made this a top book for me, though, was how even though his family pushed him to get rid of his stuttering, Jacob didn't. Jacob told him to embrace his stuttering. If he feels comfortable with who he is, than everyone else can't hurt him by making fun of how he was made. Physical weakness doesn't mean that you were made wrong, it just means that you have to battle harder, and that makes you stronger. I think that is a philosophy everyone should hear and believe.

Thursday, July 14, 2016

A new student review of When the Sea Turned To Silver by Grace Lin

Star360 posted a new student review of When the Sea Turned To Silver by Grace Lin. See the full review.

When I was younger, I loved Grace Lin’s books. One of my favorites was Where the Mountain Meets the Moon, which is a companion to When the Sea Turned to Silver. So, I was delighted to discover that Lin hasn’t lost her creative touch at all!

The idea of a girl going on an adventure to save an elderly relative is an old one — not that it isn’t full of potential. What really makes this book stand out is the fantastic incorporation of Chinese folktales. In many of the chapters, either Pinmei or her grandmother tells an engrossing folktale in an easy, flowing manner that makes readers feel like they are comfortably listening around a campfire. The stories are not just pretty words to expand the page count; rather, the characters and objects featured in the stories eventually become critical to Pinmei and Yishan’s journey. It’s refreshing to read about Chinese myths when most of the ancient cultures that schools and books focus on are from Greece, Rome, Egypt, or most recently, Norway (Percy Jackson author Rick Riordan’s new Magnus Chase series).

The main cast of characters is wonderful. Pinmei is a great main character—emotional, driven, clever, and sufficiently flawed to be realistic. Her extreme shyness is a significant challenge to overcome. Kids who wish they could speak up more will find comfort in her achievements by the end of the novel. Her friend, Yishan, is a loyal and brave companion whose secret provides a surprising twist to the plot. Amah is the kind of lovable grandmother that everyone would want to have.

Additionally, readers who have not yet enjoyed the two companion novels Where the Mountain Meets the Moon or Starry River of the Sky need not worry. I haven’t picked up a Lin book in years, and I still understood the plot and setting.

Lin’s When the Sea Turned to Silver sets readers on a sweeping mystical journey that is not to be missed.