Wednesday, May 25, 2016

A new student review of Calamity by Brandon Sanderson

TrickyCrow posted a new student review of Calamity by Brandon Sanderson. See the full review.

This was an amazing book. The story was thrilling and held my attention until I had finished. The end felt a bit rushed when compared to the first two books in the series. It started out slowly, then went to a quick jog and then to a sprint in the pacing of the story line. They dynamic between David and the Epics was interesting. Through the interactions David's true strength is found and his past no longer holds him. There is danger at every turn for David including the dangers of just interacting with Epics even his team members. I had a great time reading this book. Most fictional books have a repeated pattern that leads to a somewhat pradictable outcome, however, this book was inventive and kept me guessing. Calamity provided an amazing end to the Reckoners series.

Tuesday, May 24, 2016

A new student review of Lark Ascending by Meagan Spooner

ongsai posted a new student review of Lark Ascending by Meagan Spooner. See the full review.

I read this book without previously reading the first two. I had hoped that it would give a little more background at the beginning of this book, even as a third book, but there really wasn't. It took a good while to get and idea of what was going on. Once I understood the setting a little more, I didn't really enjoy the plotline. One of the things that I dislike in fantasy/science fiction books is when authors try to combine mechanics or modern technology with magic. There are some authors who can do it well, but this one was not well done. The boundary between machine and magic just did not flow well, and there was not enough information on the magic's limits. For books like Eragon or the Moratal Instruments, there is a deeper sense of the magical part of the story. In this book, it baiscally said: "Oh, she has magic, and it can break barriers. Yay." Also, the storyline in itself was very predictable. The troubles with her "boyfriend", the trouble with Eve being like the pefect person and making Lark misjudge herself, and the fight against an all powerful organization that thinks it's doing something good for the sake of the nation were all bad renditions of things that I have read before. 

A new student review of A Most Magical Girl by Karen Foxlee

hawkreader10 posted a new student review of A Most Magical Girl by Karen Foxlee. See the full review.

 I would recommend A Most Magical Girl to anyone in grades 4 - 7 who loves fantasy.  The format of this book is a little unusual:  It starts before Chapter 1, first describing Annabel's ability to see the future in puddles, then introducing Mr. Angel.  I found this a bit confusing at first, but it made sense as I kept reading. Overall, the book was a fast, entertaining read.  Even though “A Most Magical Girl” is a fantasy, the characters were realistic and I found myself rooting for them as they tried to complete their quest.    I think fans of Harry Potter will love this book – it has a very similar plot and fantastical feel.   

Saturday, May 21, 2016

A new student review of Asleep by Krystal Wade

lovereading posted a new student review of Asleep by Krystal Wade. See the full review.

This book shows that when you do something that goes against rules or morals, there will be consequences.  As Rose finds out things about the asylum, we can see it teaches us that the unseen can be seen; you just need to know how to look and give it time. This book has horror that kids in their teens will love, the romance of a couple that think that they can’t be together, and the mystery of what is to come. Asleep has a meld of everything you could want in a book. I hope you enjoy. Happy Reading!

Thursday, May 19, 2016

A new student review of Minotaur by Phillip W. Simpson

O.B. WAN posted a new student review of Minotaur by Phillip W. Simpson. See the full review.

Minotaur was a good, surprising tale. It also changes the readers’ perspective on myths by making them rethink everything. It’s a mix of adventure, romance, and war. There are some sad scenes, like when Asterion’s brother dies, and when Asterion is thrown into the labyrinth. There is also a bit of romance in this book. It’s very sweet. I would recommend this book to readers of the Hunger Games and The Maze Runner.

A new student review of Shades of Blue by Joyce Scarbrough

Melissa32301 posted a new student review of Shades of Blue by Joyce Scarbrough. See the full review.

Sam and JoJo are so sweet together. They're always there for each other, and they put each other first. As they grow up Sam starts changing which scares JoJo. Her best friend has become a muscular teenage boy who started to like JoJo as more than friends. When JoJo finds out about Sam being abused, she tries to help him and get him out of the house, even if it means lying to her parents. Scarborough pulls at your heart and makes you feel so many emotions, from sympathy to heartache. Sam goes through so much because of his step-father and it's so sad to read about. The writing style in Shades of Blue was really easy to follow and I felt as though I was part of the story. I felt a lot of the same emotions as JoJo did. The only thing I didn't like about the book was that JoJo seemed younger than an eighth grader and I felt a lot older than her, when I'm only in ninth grade. 

Monday, May 16, 2016

A new student review of Search (SEEK #1) by Candie Leigh Campbell

Melissa32301 posted a new student review of Search (SEEK #1) by Candie Leigh Campbell. See the full review.

I loved this book. It was a great read! As Keira learned more about the Khayal and fell in love with Johnathan, she became a very relatable character. The relationships and emotions throughout this book were really amazing, and the plot of the story was very fun to follow. I felt like I was part of the story. I can't wait for the next book to come out.

A new student review of Six Kids and a Stuffed Cat by Gary Paulsen

Madiinfl posted a new student review of Six Kids and a Stuffed Cat by Gary Paulsen. See the full review.

This was a quick, easy and enjoyable read.  The characters are very likable and the constant banter between them was perfect for the play version of the story.  I thought it was drastically different than any other piece I have read by Gary Paulsen.

This story will be perfect for a school English class, since it can be studied as a novella and/or a play.  It is for a compare and contrast.

Having a picture of a stuffed cat on the front made me think this story was for upper elementary, but it is clearly written for middle school students.  The wit used would be above most elementary student's heads.  Some of the terms would simply not be understood by younger readers, example "emotionally tone-deaf" when describing how the boy just did not notice the needs of others.

A new student review of My Life Hereafter by Lynette Ferreira

JesusFreak posted a new student review of My Life Hereafter by Lynette Ferreira. See the full review.

This book started off quickly and gained my attention immediately. The plot stayed fast-paced throughout the entirety of the read and I rarely got bored. The main character, Sunel, was a likable and believable character. The majority of teenage girls will be able to relate to the emotions Sunel felt throughout the book.

The romantic relationship in this book could have been enhanced a little more because it felt rushed and unbelievable. I wish it was developed more in order to establish a well-rounded relationship between the characters. Fleshing this out part of the plot would have made the romance more authentic.

Overall, this story is a great read for anyone who likes life-after-death stories with relatable characters and a swift plot.

Tuesday, May 10, 2016

A new student review of The Mother-Daughter Book Club: Mother-Daughter Book Camp by Heather Vogel Frederick

sakurafrost posted a new student review of The Mother-Daughter Book Club: Mother-Daughter Book Camp by Heather Vogel Frederick. See the full review.

The Mother-Daughter Book Camp was, in my opinion, the best of the seven prequels. It's a fun ride in a beautiful setting and there's something exciting that happens every chapter. From a skunk episode to a luau, this book has it all and more. Although I was sad to see the girls part ways, the book ended with a lot of hope for the future and plans to get together, so I found both plot and ending to be satisfactory. Besides a wonderfully written story, The Mother-Daughter Book Camp also encourages readers to look forward with hope and not fear, as well as advice on befriending enemies.

A new student review of Island Treasures by Alma Flor Ada

ScienceMan18 posted a new student review of Island Treasures by Alma Flor Ada. See the full review.

I think this a good book and gives insight into the life of a girl growing up in Cuba. The book shows the importance of being loved, such as when the Uncle loses his students and the caretaker burns his hand. The book also demonstrates the customs and rituals of another country.

I like how the book was divided into several mini stories that describe the key different parts of her life. I chose to review this book to discover what life in Cuba is like for the girl and the writing described this well.

I think the writing is a little slow paced and did not get to the point fast enough. But overall it was very good.

The book portrays throughout that perseverance is important: no matter what problem the family faced, they would get through it.

There was some mature content as people fake death and there are weapons. The caretaker, Somone, also burns his hands very badly.

Sunday, May 08, 2016

A new student review of Earth Girl by Janet Edwards

Reading_Between_The_Lines posted a new student review of Earth Girl by Janet Edwards. See the full review.

The book is well writen and very descriptive, and would be a great read for science fiction and dystopian lovers. It had some places that you could not put the book down. It had romance, action, sadness, and truth all wrapped up in its cover. This book has some places which makes the book more suitable for mature tweens or teenagers (mentions of sex and scary situations), but is a great read as a whole.